Vienna Waltz by Teresa Grant (audiobook) – Narrated by Derek Perkins

Vienna Waltz audio

Nothing is fair in love and war…

Europe’s elite have gathered at the glittering Congress of Vienna–princes, ambassadors, the Russian tsar–all negotiating the fate of the continent by day and pursuing pleasure by night. Until Princess Tatiana, the most beautiful and talked about woman in Vienna, is found murdered during an ill-timed rendezvous with three of her most powerful conquests…

Suzanne Rannoch has tried to ignore rumors that her new husband, Malcolm, has also been tempted by Tatiana. As a protgégé of France’s Prince Talleyrand and attach for Britain’s Lord Castlereagh, Malcolm sets out to investigate the murder and must enlist Suzanne’s special skills and knowledge if he is to succeed. As a complex dance between husband and wife in the search for the truth ensues, no one’s secrets are safe, and the future of Europe may hang in the balance…

Rating: B+ for narration; A- for content

Vienna Waltz is a real treat for fans of meaty, intricately plotted and well-researched historical fiction. Set during the Congress of Vienna in 1814, when the ambassadors from the major powers in Europe – Britain, Austria, Prussia, Russia and France – gathered in order to seek a long-term peace following the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars, the book is the first in a series of mystery/espionage novels featuring Malcolm Rannoch, attaché to the British delegation, and his half-French, half-Spanish wife, Suzanne.

While ostensibly a diplomat and bureaucrat, Malcolm is in fact one of the British Foreign minister’s most successful intelligence agents – he doesn’t like the word “spy”. His wife is equally tough and resourceful and, like her husband, adept at keeping secrets – many of which pertain to their hasty marriage two years previously. We learn throughout the course of the story that theirs is a marriage of convenience, albeit one “with benefits”, as they have a son. Malcolm literally stumbled across Suzanne, bruised and bloodied following an attack on her home – during an intelligence mission in the Spanish mountains. After escorting her to the British Embassy in Lisbon it seemed that marriage was the most logical way to afford her his protection.

As a working partnership in the service of the British government, they are a superb team, and as parents, they dote on their son, Colin. But as a couple, their relationship is shrouded in the unspoken, and they are quite guarded around each other when it comes to expressing their feelings. Malcolm, the grandson of a duke, had never intended to marry, given the frequency with which he is required to risk his life and the example afforded him by his parents of a disastrous marriage in which both partners were frequently and blatantly unfaithful. And Suzanne is a mystery – to Malcolm and to the listener – although some aspects of her past are revealed in this story. Yet while the pair views their marriage as one of expediency, it’s obvious to everyone who sees them together that they care very deeply for each other.

The romantic angle in the book is fairly low key, although it is integral to the story. At the beginning, Suzanne receives a note from Princess Tatiana Kirsanova, one of the most beautiful women present at the Congress. The princess is known to have taken many lovers from the highest echelons of society, including both Tsar Alexander of Russia and Prince Metternich, Foreign Minister of Austria. And, if rumour is to be believed, Suzanne’s own husband is one of those men currently in receipt of the lady’s favours.

You can read the rest of this review at AudioGals

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