The Determined Lord Hadleigh (King’s Elite #4) by Virginia Heath

This title may be purchased from Amazon.

He’s got iron control…

But she might be his undoing!

Part of The King’s Elite. Haunted by Penny Penhurst’s courage on the witness stand, meticulous barrister Lord Hadleigh offers her a housekeeper position at his estate. Despite trying to stay detached, Hadleigh is charmed by her small child and surprised by how much he yearns for this proud woman! Can this he break through his own – and Penny’s – barriers to prove he’s a man she can trust…and love?

Rating: A-

As there is an overarching plotline running through this series, there are spoilers for the earlier books in this review.

This final book in Virginia Heath’s enjoyable King’s Elite series shifts focus somewhat and concerns itself mostly with the aftermath of the unmasking and apprehension (in the previous book) of The Boss, the head of a widespread and dangerous smuggling ring that was channeling funds to Napoléon and his supporters with a view to restoring him to power. The Determined Lord Hadleigh rounds the series out nicely and follows a thoroughly engaging central couple on their sometimes rocky path to happiness.

The eponymous gentleman describes himself as an honorary member of the team of crack government spies knows as the King’s Elite, which is fair enough, as unlike them, he’s not an agent working for the Crown, but rather is the man whose job it is to prosecute and help convict those they apprehend. He’s a brilliant barrister, a fair and honourable man, and a friend of the other members of the group – and now it’s his turn to step into the limelight. Hadleigh appeared briefly in the other books in the series, and now it’s up to him to make sure the Crown’s case against the Boss is watertight. When the novel opens, he is in the midst of the trial of Viscount Penshurst, one of the Boss’ closest associates, and is questioning his current witness, the young Lady Penshurst, whose honesty and quiet dignity in the face of the nasty gossip and blatant scorn of the public impresses him and whose story strikes a chord deep inside him. Hadleigh sees many similarities between the life the viscountess describes and that endured by his mother, who was abused and then killed by his father a decade earlier – and he still carries the guilt that he didn’t do enough to protect her. That guilt engenders a protectiveness made all the stronger when he learns that the viscount’s title, wealth and estates have been transferred back to the crown, meaning his innocent wife and son will be left with nothing.

After the trial and her husband’s death in prison, Lady Penshurst changes her name and takes lodgings in Cheapside with her not-quite-two-year-old son, Freddie. Her closest friend Clarissa – who is married to Seb Leatham (The Mysterious Lord Millcroft) – has offered to house them both for as long as Penny wants, but Penny is insistent that she wants to stand on her own two feet. After three years trapped in an abusive marriage with a man who wanted to control her every move, she’s determined to slough off the easily cowed, powerless and subservient woman she became during those years and to find herself again, to take back control of her life. So when she discovers that someone has been helping her out behind the scenes, paying bills and rent, she’s furious. Her first thought is that Clarissa has gone behind her back and asked Seb to do it, but when Clarissa assures her that she values their friendship too much to go against her express wishes, Penny believes her. Worried that perhaps one of her late husband’s associates has done it as a way of intimidating her, Penny asks Clarissa to find out what she can about her mysterious benefactor.

Hadleigh has tried continually – and fruitlessly – to forget about Lady Penshurst, but no matter how many times he tells himself she’s not his problem, he feels the need to do something to help her.  So he’s bewildered when confronted by an annoyed Seb Leatham reaming him out for doing just that – until he learns that his actions may have unintentionally caused the lady some distress.  An awkward apology follows, and he promises not to attempt to interfere again.  But then an opportunity presents itself whereby Hadleigh can help Penny while at the same time enabling her to be independent, and in spite of his own misgivings, he has to take it.  In preparing for the Boss’ trial, he will need to consult and work with his star witness – Jessamine, Lady Flint – frequently, but with some members of the gang still at large, her husband is naturally reluctant to have her travel to London.  Hadleigh’s family home is just outside London, in Essex, so he suggests to thehead of the King’s Elite that Lady Flint be housed there until the trial.  With government approval, Hadleigh offers Penny a position as temporary housekeeper, explaining that he’s not paying her wages, and that she will in fact be doing him and the government a big favour by agreeing to take the post.

Even though Hadleigh has no intention of spending much time at the house – which holds too many unhappy memories for him – he nonetheless finds himself going there more often than he originally intended, seeking out Penny, talking with her and enjoying her company.  And as they start getting to know each other, Penny begins to see past the controlled, somewhat aloof Hadleigh, to the complex, thoughtful and charming man he truly is, and to allow herself to enjoy feeling desired and desirable.

The Determined Lord Hadleigh is a fabulous character-driven piece that works as both a beautifully developed romance and a clever character study as Ms. Heath takes a good, long look at what drives Penny and Hadleigh to act the way they do.  Penny isn’t afraid of her attraction to Hadleigh – in fact she welcomes it, and I loved that she wasn’t prepared to allow the misery she endured during her marriage prevent her from moving forward with her life.  I admired her strength and determination not to allow herself to be seen as a victim:

“… that is not the way I see myself.  It is such a small part of who I am, yet it appears to be the version of myself others are most content with accepting… Maybe I should have it written on my forehead to make it easier for people to decide how to view me? Poor, downtrodden Penny !  Rather that, than as that brave woman who spoke out in the dock. “

Penny is also extremely perceptive, and it doesn’t take her long to work out why Hadleigh so dislikes the house and why he acted as he did towards her. His character growth is substantial as – with Penny’s help – he is able to face and conquer his demons and accept that he can’t save everyone, and that a person is the sum of many parts.

“… simply because the cap fits, a person shouldn’t be expected to always wear it when the world is joyously filled with different hates and we, as individuals, have the right to choose, try them on for size and discard them as the mood takes us.”

The Determined Lord Hadleigh is a ‘quiet’ book about two emotionally bruised people learning to come to terms with tragedy and move forward together.  For my money, it’s the best and strongest book of the King’s Elite series, and although it could be read as a standalone, I’d advise reading at least book three (The Disgraceful Lord Gray) first. Virginia Heath’s writing is as warm, witty and insightful as ever, and she continues to be one of the best authors of historical romance around.  I’m looking forward to whatever she comes up with next.

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