The Henchmen of Zenda by K.J. Charles

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Jasper Detchard is a disgraced British officer, now selling his blade to the highest bidder. Currently that’s Michael Elphberg, half-brother to the King of Ruritania. Michael wants the throne for himself, and Jasper is one of the scoundrels he hires to help him take it. But when Michael makes his move, things don’t go entirely to plan—and the penalty for treason is death.

Rupert of Hentzau is Michael’s newest addition to his sinister band of henchmen. Charming, lethal, and intolerably handsome, Rupert is out for his own ends—which seem to include getting Jasper into bed. But Jasper needs to work out what Rupert’s really up to amid a maelstrom of plots, swordfights, scheming, impersonation, desire, betrayal, and murder.

Nobody can be trusted. Everyone has a secret. And love is the worst mistake you can make.

A retelling of the swashbuckling classic The Prisoner of Zenda from a very different point of view.

Rating: A-

I’ve been looking forward to The Henchmen of Zenda, K.J. Charles’ ‘queered’ retelling of the classic The Prisoner of Zenda, ever since she announced it months ago, and in fact the book made my ‘most eagerly awaited of 2018 list‘ at AAR.  I love a ripping adventure yarn, and that’s exactly what the author has delivered – a tale of swashbuckling derring-do featuring a pair of amoral, cynical and devil-may-care anti-heroes, palace intrigue, political shenanigans, double crosses, triple crosses… and hot sex.  The latter being missing from Anthony Hope’s original novel, which isn’t surprising considering it was written in 1894. 😛  The Henchmen of Zenda can be enjoyed without reference to the original, although I’ll admit that for me, part of the fun was spotting the places where the stories meshed and picking up on the in-jokes.

For anyone not familiar with The Prisoner of Zenda, the story is basically this. Rudolf V, the new King of (the fictional) small European country of Ruritania, is drugged on the eve of his coronation by those working for his half-brother, Michael, Duke of Strelsau, who wants the throne for himself.  In a desperate attempt to stop Michael, those loyal to the king persuade an English gentleman (Rudolf Rassendyll) who bears an uncanny resemblance to the monarch and happens to be holidaying in their country to impersonate the king during the coronation.  Things are complicated when Michael’s men kidnap the king and Rassendyll falls in love with the Princess Flavia, who is Rudolf’s betrothed; complications, plots and counter-plots ensue, Rassendyll leads an assault on the castle of Zenda and rescues the king, and then honourably bows out, leaving Flavia to do her duty to her king and country.

When our narrator, Jasper Detchard, immediately dismisses Rassendyll’s account as a pile of shit, and Rassendyll as an uptight prick who lied to make himself look good, the reader immediately knows they’re in for a rollicking good time.  Detchard’s deadpan, sarcastic narrative style grabbed me right away:

“My name is Jasper Detchard, and according to Rassendyll’s narrative, I am dead.  This should give you some idea of his accuracy, since I do not dictate these words to some cabbage-scented medium from beyond the veil.”

A disgraced former army officer who now makes his living as a mercenary, Detchard is approached by Michael Elphberg, Duke of Strelsau, to become one of his trusted bodyguard (known as The Six).   Michael demands absolute, unquestioning loyalty, and Detchard, not one to be overly picky as to where he lays his hat or sells his sword – signs up. As it turns out, for more than he bargained for.

You can read the rest of this review at All About Romance.

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Jackdaw by K.J. Charles (audiobook) – Narrated by Cornell Collins


This title may be downloaded from Audible via Amazon

If you stop running, you fall.

Jonah Pastern is a magician, a liar, a windwalker, a professional thief…and for six months, he was the love of police constable Ben Spenser’s life. His betrayal left Ben jailed, ruined, alone, and looking for revenge.

Ben is determined to make Jonah pay. But he can’t seem to forget what they once shared, and Jonah refuses to let him. Soon Ben is entangled in Jonah’s chaotic existence all over again, and they’re running together – from the police, the justiciary, and some dangerous people with a lethal grudge against them.

Threatened on all sides by betrayals, secrets, and the laws of the land, the policeman and the thief must find a way to live and love before the past catches up with them…

Rating: Narration – A- : Content – A

In an effort to prevent withdrawal symptoms after finishing K.J. Charles’ A Charm of Magpies trilogy, I jumped eagerly into listening to Jackdaw, which is set in the same universe and which tells the story of Jonah Pastern, who appeared as an important secondary character in book three, Flight of Magpies. Jonah – a type of practitioner (magician) known as a Windwalker because of his ability to manipulate air currents and to literally walk on air – was instrumental in the revenge planned by an evil warlock against Lucien, Lord Crane, and Stephen Day. Jonah came across as amoral, charming and irresponsible; he may have been coerced into co-operating with the warlock, but he had his own agenda and didn’t care who got hurt in the crossfire as long as it wasn’t him.

Jackdaw opens with disgraced former policeman, Ben Spenser (using an assumed name), trying to find his erstwhile lover, the man who upended and destroyed his life. Meeting the handsome force of nature that was Jonah Pastern some six months or so earlier, and falling in love, secure in the knowledge that the feeling was returned, had been the happiest time of Ben’s life – until it all fell apart when he witnessed Jonah in the midst of a burglary at a local museum. Jonah escaped, leaving a confused, furious and brokenhearted Ben to face the consequences, not only of having shared a home with a thief, but of having had an illegal relationship (i.e. a homosexual one) with him.

You can read the rest of this review at AudioGals.

Flight of Magpies (A Charm of Magpies #3) by K.J. Charles (audiobook) – Narrated by Cornell Collins

This title may be downloaded from Audible via Amazon

Danger in the air. Lovers on the brink.

A Charm of Magpies, Book 3: With the justiciary understaffed, a series of horrifying occult murders to be investigated, and a young student who is flying – literally – off the rails, magical law enforcer Stephen Day is under increasing stress. And his relationship with his aristocratic lover, Lord Crane, is beginning to feel the strain. Crane chafes at the restrictions of England’s laws, and there’s a worrying development in the blood-and-sex bond he shares with Stephen. A development that makes a sensible man question if they should be together at all.

When a thief strikes at the heart of Crane’s home, a devastating loss brings his closest relationships into bitter conflict – especially his relationship with Stephen. And as old enemies, new enemies, and unexpected enemies paint the lovers into a corner, the pressure threatens to tear them apart.

Warning: Contains hot-blooded sex, cold-blooded murder, sinister magical goings-on, and a lot of swearing.

Rating: Narration – A+ : Content – A

So compelling was K.J. Charles’Flight of Magpies that I listened to all six-and-a-half-hours of it in one sitting. In the third book of the A Charm of Magpies series, the author has crafted an engrossing story full of intrigue, magic and danger which pits our heroes, Lucien, Lord Crane and practitioner (magician) Stephen Day, against some truly evil old enemies bent on revenge while at the same time exploring the effects of, for want of a better expression, ‘real life’ on a couple in an established – although illegal – relationship.

Please note that there are spoilers for books one and two in this review.

By the end of book two of the trilogy, A Case of Possession, Lucien and Stephen are a couple; ILYs have been exchanged, Lucien has decided to remain in England with Stephen – at least, until such time as he can persuade his lover to go to Shanghai with him – and they’re in it for the long haul. Stephen has always been a bit elusive, but he’s now spending several nights a week at Lucien’s flat and their lives are becoming more and more intertwined, and not just because they are inextricably linked together by an ancient and potent magic. Lucien’s ancestor, The Magpie Lord, was the most powerful sorcerer England has ever seen, and although Lucien has no magical abilities himself, the supernatural power that runs through his blood can somehow amplify Stephen’s already considerable abilities and together, they are a force to be reckoned with.

You can read the rest of this review at AudioGals.

Why Kill the Innocent (Sebastian St. Cyr #13) by C.S. Harris

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London, 1814. As a cruel winter holds the city in its icy grip, the bloody body of a beautiful young musician is found half-buried in a snowdrift. Jane Ambrose’s ties to Princess Charlotte, the only child of the Prince Regent and heir presumptive to the throne, panic the palace, which moves quickly to shut down any investigation into the death of the talented pianist. But Sebastian St. Cyr, Viscount Devlin, and his wife Hero refuse to allow Jane’s murderer to escape justice.

Untangling the secrets of Jane’s world leads Sebastian into a maze of dangerous treachery where each player has his or her own unsavory agenda and no one can be trusted. As the Thames freezes over and the people of London pour onto the ice for a Frost Fair, Sebastian and Hero find their investigation circling back to the palace and building to a chilling crescendo of deceit and death . . .

Rating: A

C.S. Harris has maintained a consistently high standard throughout her long-running Sebastian St. Cyr series of historical mysteries, but the last two or three books, in particular, have been outstanding – which is quite remarkable when one considers that this latest instalment, Why Kill the Innocent, is number thirteen.  The individual mysteries are extremely well-constructed and set against a superbly researched and realised historical background; and so far, each one has been self-contained, so that each book could be read as a standalone.  Notice I used the word could – because actually, this isn’t a series I would recommend dipping in and out of or reading out of order, because there are overarching plot threads that run from book to book you really don’t want to miss out on.  But unlike the other books in the series, the previous one – Where the Dead Lie –  left some aspects of the mystery unsolved and readers wondering whether the main villain of the was ever going to be made to pay for his crimes.  As we’re at book thirteen of a fifteen-book series, I’m guessing the answer is yes, but we’re going to have to wait a little while longer to see it!

Why Kill the Innocent is set in the winter of 1814, which is on record as being one of the coldest ever experienced in England.  On her way back from a charitable visit in the East End, Sebastian’s wife Hero stumbles – literally – on a body lying in the street, and is surprised to recognise the dead woman as Jane Ambrose, a talented musician who taught piano to a number of the children of the nobility – including Princess Charlotte, daughter of the Regent and Heir Presumptive to the throne.   It’s immediately obvious that Jane was murdered – she died from a blow to the head – and that the lack of blood around her indicates she was killed elsewhere. Hero immediately sends for her husband and for Henry Lovejoy, the magistrate from Bow Street who has aided Sebastian on a number of investigations and has become a friend; all of them know that once the news of Jane’s death is made public, the palace machinery will move fast to prevent any scandal being attached to the princess by covering up the truth and preventing any further investigation into the matter.  Or trying to – because Sebastian isn’t about to allow the brutal murder of a young woman to go unnoticed or her murderer to evade justice.

I don’t want to say much more about the plot, which is utterly compelling and kept me turning the pages into the small hours. Although Jane Ambrose is dead when we meet her, the picture built up of her through the eyes of others is poignant and intriguing. A musical genius at a time when ladies were never supposed to excel at anything other than being decorative, Jane had to supress her gift for performing and composing and instead spend her time teaching others. Her marriage was not happy, and her husband’s infidelities and abuse, coupled with death of her two children from illness a year earlier eventually led to a profound change in the woman who had previously been a model wife. She was clearly a woman driven to the edge, but who, instead of falling over, found or rediscovered an inner strength that gave her the will to stand up and fight for herself and others. Her desire to protect Princess Charlotte from an enforced marriage to a man bound to make her miserable meant that Jane put herself in the middle of what proved to be deadly palace intrigue and political manoeuvring – most of it masterminded by Hero’s father, Lord Jarvis, a cold, ruthless man who will do whatever it takes to maintain his position as the power behind the throne.

As usual, Sebastian finds himself baulked at many a turn of the investigation; everyone has secrets they are determined to keep and nobody can be trusted… and those in positions of power are actively trying to prevent him from uncovering the truth which, of course turns out to have implications far more wide-reaching than he could ever have suspected.

One of the many enjoyable things about this series has been Ms. Harris’ obvious love for and knowledge of the period in which it is set. She has a splendid grasp of the volatile political situation of the time, and makes very good use of that knowledge to provide a solid historical background to her stories. In this novel, however, I think the author has outdone herself. The background to the tale, the terrible relationship between the Prince Regent and his daughter, how he almost hated her for her popularity and tried to control every aspect of her life… it’s all true. The Regent really did treat his wife in the appalling manner described, and his paranoia, his excesses, his narcissism and lack of interest in the people he ruled are all matters of record, gleaned from correspondence with friends and family. Many of the secondary characters in the story are real, or are closely based on historical figures, and many of the events – such as Princess Charlotte deliberately procrastinating over an unwanted betrothal – actually happened. All these things – and more – are seamlessly and skilfully incorporated into the story without the reader ever being subjected to info-dumps or a static history lesson – which just goes to show that truth really is stranger than fiction at times.

The setting of a London so cold that the Thames froze over is hard for the modern Londoner to envisage, but Ms. Harris’ descriptions of a city blanketed in white and the Frost Fair on the river are wonderfully evocative and paint a detailed picture in the mind of the reader of what it must have looked like. But as well as the Christmas-Card imagery, she takes care to show us the other side of the pretty picture; of the extreme hardship faced by the poor when the extraordinary weather conditions led to shortages of food and fuel.

The reparation of Sebastian’s relationship with his father continues apace, and I loved watching Sebastian’s interactions with his young son. He and Hero are obviously very much in love and are devoted to each other – yet they don’t live in each other’s pockets. They know each other very well, and the trust and confidence Sebastian places in his wife is admirable, while Hero’s ability to listen and understand have become his bedrock.

The long running plot thread concerning Sebastian’s parentage doesn’t get much screen time here and the threads left over from the previous book are also not forgotten, but both are passing mentions, which I thought a wise move given that there is more than enough here to keep the reader glued to the story. There is also, clearly, more to come from the recently widowed Jarvis and Hero’s manipulative cousin Victoria, and I can’t wait to see how things pan out.

The murder mystery is satisfyingly complex, the historical detail is fascinating and I continue to adore Sebastian St. Cyr, a character who has come such a long way since we first met him as an angry, damaged and resentful veteran of war. With its masterful storytelling, intricate plotting and intriguing characters, Why Kill the Innocent is a truly gripping read and I’m sure that fans of the series need no endorsement from me to be waiting to pounce on it upon release.

The Sins of Lord Lockwood (Rules for the Reckless #6) by Meredith Duran

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BACK FROM THE DEAD, AN EARL SEEKS VENGEANCE…

Liam Devaliant, Lord Lockwood, was born into a charmed life. Charismatic, powerful, and wild, he had the world at his feet—and one woman as his aim. His wedding to Anna was meant to be his greatest triumph. Instead, in a single moment, a wicked conspiracy robbed him of his future and freedom.

…BUT WILL HIS LONG-LOST COUNTESS PAY THE PRICE?

Four years later, Liam has returned from death with plans for revenge. Standing in his way, though, is his long-absent bride. Once, he adored Anna’s courage. Now it seems like a curse, for Anna refuses to fear or forget him. If she can’t win back Liam’s love, then she means at least to save his soul…no matter the cost.

Rating: A

It’s been a decade since Liam Devaliant, the Earl of Lockwood, stepped onto the pages of Meredith Duran’s début novel, The Duke of ShadowsHandsome, charming and enigmatic, Lockwood immediately captured my attention, the mention of his mysterious four year absence from society and his obvious discomfiture at the presence of his estranged wife clearly hiding a story begging to be told – and now here it is.  The Sins of Lord Lockwood is an intense, angsty story that is sometimes hard to read, but is nonetheless a compelling tale of a man’s struggle to find his place after having his life ripped away from him, and a painful portrait of a marriage rent asunder by hatred and greed.

Anna, Countess of Lockwood and Countess of Forth (a Scottish title she holds in her own right) has learned, second-hand, of the return to England of the husband who deserted her on their wedding night four years earlier – and she’s furious.  Furious that she was stupid enough to fall for him all those years ago, furious that he abandoned her, furious she’s heard nothing of him for four years – and furious he hasn’t bothered to tell her he’s back and she’s had to learn of it from the newspapers.

When his wife arrives unexpectedly at his – their – London town house, Liam realises he’s seriously miscalculated.  He had thought he would have at least another month before news of his return could have reached her at her home on the Isle of Rawsey – where she retreated after his disappearance – a month in which he could bring to fruition his plan to have his revenge upon the man responsible for having him kidnapped on his wedding night and bundled aboard a ship taking convicts to New South Wales. That man is Liam’s cousin, Stephen, the man with whom he’d grown up and played as a boy, and who he’d looked out for all their lives – but with no direct evidence against him, Liam has to play a careful, devious game behind the scenes. With the help of his friends Julian, Duke of Auburn, and Crispin Burke MP, Liam is putting an end to Stephen’s fraudulent businesses and strategically and systematically bringing his cousin to the brink of financial ruin.

Anna’s sudden appearance in London doesn’t simply make a ripple in the pond of Liam’s careful existence – it throws a large rock into the middle and almost drowns him in the resulting explosion of spray.  He doesn’t want to be reminded of the feelings he’d had for her or the man he had been, and he certainly doesn’t want her in harm’s way – but she’s having none of it. Anna will remain in London for as long as she wishes; she will live in their house, she will do as she pleases and Liam can go – or, rather return – to the devil … but not until after he has given her the only thing she wants from him – an heir to the earldom of Forth.  Lockwood might not want an heir to his title, but she wants one for hers, and he’s the only means by which she can obtain legitimate progeny.

It’s a nice piece of role reversal to have it be the woman need of an heir; historical romance is littered with stories in which the man marries in order to do his dynastic duty, but rarely have I read a story in which it’s the woman in that situation, so that makes for a refreshing change. But Sins of Lord Lockwood is so much more than a novel in which an alienated couple find each other again because of the need to procreate. It’s the story of two people who still care for each other, but who have been damaged in very different ways and must learn to accept themselves as they are and to allow themselves to love and be loved. Liam’s scars are dreadfully deep, both physically and emotionally; he has taken to hiding behind a variety of different façades in order to prevent those around him from seeing how truly and irrevocably broken he is, and he can’t bear the thought of enduring anyone’s pity – least of all his wife’s. And Anna, an independent, outspoken and no-nonsense young woman, whose pedigree and wealth mean that her ‘eccentricities’ are viewed benignly by society, carries emotional scars of her own that are buried so deeply that nobody could ever guess at them.

The story is, of course, based on a major misconception; Anna’s belief that Liam left her by choice – and he takes no action to contradict that assumption. He constantly evades Anna’s questions, letting her believe him to be nothing more than the heartless gold-digger she has clearly convinced herself he was all along, but Ms. Duran brilliantly counteracts that in a series of carefully placed flashback chapters that chart the development of Liam and Anna’s romance four years earlier. Anna, a great heiress and peeress in her own right needs to find a husband in order to secure the access rights to the Isle of Rawsey and the future of its inhabitants. An impoverished English earl is nowhere on her list of suitable husbands, yet the handsome, charming Earl of Lockwood somehow manages to disarm her and breeze past her defences. For his part, Liam has never met anyone like the Countess of Forth, and even though he knows he can have no chance with her – she’s far too shrewd to allow herself to be wooed for her money – he is very soon smitten with her intelligence and her indomitable spirit as well as her smile and lush figure. These chapters are simply beautiful as they show the younger, unburdened (or less burdened) Liam and Anna falling in love almost against their better judgements and entering into what they tell each other is a marriage for the sake of expediency – and which is clearly anything but.

Both principals are strong, stubborn, flawed characters you can’t help but root for, even at those times you itch to bang their heads together. Anna is independent and strong-willed, but never in an over-the-top, “look at me, I’m unconventional” way – she’s a woman of her time who is able to bend the rules a little because of her wealth and status… and because she can afford not to give a damn what anyone else thinks. When she finally discovers the truth of what happened to Liam she comes out fighting, her fierce championing of him catching him off guard:

“You tried to hide them? [his scars] Why, you should walk naked in the street to boast of what you survived. Other men would learn then what it means to be a man – to survive all that, and to come home triumphant… You are mine and I am keeping you.”

Liam is complex and tormented, so much so that at times it’s difficult to believe he will ever be able to recover from the brutalisation and humiliation he endured at the hands of his captors. The intensity of Anna’s belief him and her unwavering support go some way towards helping Liam to find his way back to his true self, and he is further aided by his great friend Julian Sinclair (The Duke of Shadows), a man who has battled demons of his own, and whose advice, when it comes, is relevant and very much borne of experience. The relationship between the two men, previously glimpsed in the earlier book, is superbly done, and Julian’s presence is thus integral to the story rather than one of those ‘remember me?’ cameo appearances so often found in sequels and series books.

As I said at the beginning, The Sins of Lord Lockwood – who, surely, is more sinned against than sinning? – is an angst-laden story filled with moments of such intensity and raw emotion that it almost hurts to read them. I recognise that it might not suit those who prefer their historicals to be light and fluffy, but angst is my catnip and I enjoyed every single moment of this complex, deeply sensual and beautifully written novel. Ten years is a long time to wait, but when the result is as good as this one… maybe the wait is justified. And when one takes into account all the wonderful novels Ms. Duran has given us in the intervening years, I, for one, don’t feel the least bit short-changed.

The Marigold Chain by Stella Riley (audiobook) – Narrated by Alex Wyndham

This title may be downloaded from Audible via Amazon

England, 1666; the year all the prophecies said the world would end. For Chloe Hervaux, marriage to wild, unpredictable Alex Deveril offers escape from a home she hates. For Alex, waking up with an epic hangover, the discovery that he has acquired a bride is an unwelcome shock. But while the marriage remains in name only, other forces are gathering.

England is at war with the Dutch, and Prince Rupert suspects that sabotage is at work in the fleet. Instructed to find and stop the traitor, Alex enters a dark, secret labyrinth of intrigue – where no life is safe and nothing is what it seems.

Chloe, meanwhile, navigates the shark-infested waters of Charles 11’s licentious Court and plots a course of her own aimed at financial independence. But as the diverse facets of Mr. Deveril’s personality are gradually revealed, her mock-marriage becomes fraught with difficulties – the greatest of which is Mr. Deveril himself.

Absorbed in his search for a traitor, Alex spares little thought for personal matters and less for his bride. But as the flames of the Great Fire sweep over London, he and Chloe face their ultimate test. Their world is at risk…their choices may save it.

The Marigold Chain is a richly-woven tale of intrigue, danger, and love set against a backdrop of Restoration England during the year expected to be Doomsday.

Rating: Narration – A: Content – A

The Marigold Chain is one of Stella Riley’s earliest published works, and, as it’s a long-time favourite of mine, I’ve been waiting not-at-all patiently for it to make an appearance in audiobook format. I first read it in the mid-1980s and loved it; for me, it ticks all the boxes. A brilliant, gorgeous, sharp-tongued hero enters into a marriage of convenience with a practical, quick-witted heroine who doesn’t take any of his crap; set that against the backdrop of the politics and intrigue-laden Restoration court of Charles II, and you’ve got another winner from a writer who really knows how to put the historical into historical romance while at the same time creating a tender, sensual love story. With the exceptionally talented Alex Wyndham once more at the microphone, there’s no question The Marigold Chain is a fabulous audio experience – so just sink into your favourite chair, lock the door, take the phone off the hook and let the world look after itself for a few hours while you get stuck in!

You can read the rest of this review at AudioGals.

The Secret Casebook of Simon Feximal by K.J. Charles (audiobook) – Narrated by Gary Furlong

This title may be downloaded from Audible via Amazon

A story too secret, too terrifying – and too shockingly intimate – for Victorian eyes.

Dear Henry,

I have been Simon Feximal’s companion, assistant, and chronicler for 20 years now, and during that time my Casebooks of Feximal the Ghost-Hunter have spread the reputation of this most accomplished of ghost-hunters far and wide.

You have asked me often for the tale of our first meeting, and how my association with Feximal came about. I have always declined, because it is a story too private to be truthfully recounted, and a memory too precious to be falsified. But none knows better than I that stories must be told.

So here is it, Henry, a full and accurate account of how I met Simon Feximal, which I shall leave with my solicitor to pass to you after my death.

I dare say it may not be quite what you expect.

Robert Caldwell
September 1914

Rating: Narration – A-: Content – A

K.J. Charles’ The Secret Casebook of Simon Feximal is a collection of wonderfully imaginative, well-written and downright spooky tales of ghostly goings on and supernatural shenanigans set in the late Victorian era featuring ghost-hunter extraordinaire, Simon Feximal, and his chronicler and long-term companion Robert Caldwell. The author draws on ancient legends and late Victorian sensation fiction for inspiration and has crafted a set of original and compelling creations while also charting the development of the relationship between her two protagonists, a lasting partnership built on a solid foundation of love and respect that endures through dark days and the direst of adversity.

When we first meet Robert Caldwell, he is a making a name for himself as a journalist for The Chronicle. He has recently inherited old, dilapidated Caldwell Place and decides to sell it rather than live there. The only problem is that it appears to be haunted – and when the walls start bleeding, Robert realises he’s got to do something about it before he can even think of putting the place up for sale. So, he calls in the renowned ghost-hunter Simon Feximal in the hope that he will be able to get rid of his unwanted, ghoulish guest, and is immediately struck by Simon’s imposing form and air of command. Feximal clearly knows what he’s doing – but both he and Robert have reckoned without the strength of a spirit long denied its desires, and a highly-charged, passionate encounter ensues which sends the mischievous spirit packing and sees our principals left to their own – most pleasurable – devices.

You can read the rest of this review at AudioGals.