The Wicked Cousin (Rockliffe #4) by Stella Riley (audiobook) – Narrated by Alex Wyndham

This title is available to download from Audible via Amazon

Sebastian Audley has spent years setting every city in Europe by the ears and keeping the scandal-sheets in profit. Word that he is finally returning to London becomes the hottest topic of the Season and casts numerous young ladies – many of whom have never seen him – into a fever of anticipation.

Cassandra Delahaye is not one of them. In her opinion, love affairs and duels, coupled with a reputation for never refusing even the most death-defying wager, suggest that Mr. Audley is short of a brain cell or two. And while their first, very unorthodox meeting shows that perhaps he isn’t entirely stupid, it creates other reservations entirely.

Sebastian finds dodging admiring females and living down his reputation for reckless dare-devilry a full-time occupation. He had known that putting the past behind him in a society with an insatiable appetite for scandal and gossip would not be easy. But what he had not expected was to become the target of a former lover’s dangerous obsession…or to find himself falling victim to a pair of storm-cloud eyes.

Rating: Narration – A+ Content – A-


Those two names up there in the review title should be enough to tell you why you need to go and buy this audiobook at once. The combination of Ms. Riley’s wonderfully intelligent writing and Mr. Wyndham’s extraordinary skills as a narrator is always a delight to experience, and in The Wicked Cousin, book four in the author’s Rockliffe series of Georgian-set romances, both author and narrator are at the top of their game.

Following the death of his twin brother, Theo, at the age of eight, young Sebastian Audley, now the only son and heir of Viscount Wingham, spends the best part of the next thirteen years chafing at being wrapped up in several layers of cotton wool and over-protected to the point of suffocation. So naturally, as soon as he is able to do so, he sets about raising merry hell, which he does up and down the length and breadth of Europe with such great success that his exploits become the stuff of legend and his name regularly appears in the scandal sheets.

You can read the rest of this review at AudioGals.

Advertisements

Cocoa Beach by Beatriz Williams (audiobook) – Narrated by Eva Kaminsky and Alex Wyndham

This title may be downloaded from Audible via Amazon

Burdened by a dark family secret, Virginia Fortescue flees her oppressive home in New York City for the battlefields of World War I France. While an ambulance driver for the Red Cross, she meets a charismatic British army surgeon whose persistent charm opens her heart to the possibility of love. As the war rages, Virginia falls into a passionate affair with the dashing Captain Simon Fitzwilliam, only to discover that his past has its own dark secrets – secrets that will damage their eventual marriage and propel her back across the Atlantic to the sister and father she left behind.

Five years later, in the early days of Prohibition, the newly widowed Virginia Fitzwilliam arrives in the tropical boomtown of Cocoa Beach, Florida, to settle her husband’s estate. Despite the evidence, Virginia does not believe Simon perished in the fire that destroyed the seaside home he built for her and their young daughter. Separated from her husband since the early days of their marriage, the headstrong Virginia plans to uncover the truth, for the sake of the daughter Simon never met.

Simon’s brother and sister welcome her with open arms and introduce her to a dazzling new world of citrus groves, white beaches, bootleggers, and Prohibition agents. But Virginia senses a predatory presence lurking beneath the irresistible, hedonistic surface of this coastal oasis. The more she learns about Simon and his mysterious business interests, the more she fears that the dangers that surrounded Simon now threaten her and their daughter’s life as well.

Rating: Narration – A- Content – B

Having very much enjoyed listening to The Wicked City earlier this year (and being a fan of this author’s alter-ego, Juliana Gray), I was keen to listen to Beatriz Williams’ latest offering, Cocoa Beach, which follows a young widow as she tries to discover the truth about the estranged husband who recently perished in a house fire at his Florida home. It is loosely linked to both The Wicked City and the book which preceded it, A Certain Age, insofar as some of the characters have either appeared or been mentioned in one or both of those novels, but otherwise Cocoa Beach can be enjoyed as a standalone.

In 1917, Virginia Fortescue flees her oppressive home in New York to drive ambulances back and forth between the trenches and the field hospitals of Northern France. The USA has not yet joined the war, but she and a group of other volunteers led by the wealthy and formidable Mrs. DeForest are out there “doing their bit”, in whatever capacities they can be useful. On a trip to pick up some wounded men and take them to the hospital Mrs. DeForest has set up in an old château, Virginia meets the handsome, charismatic Captain Simon Fitzwilliam, an army surgeon, and he ends up travelling back to the hospital with her in order to inspect the facilities. There’s an instant frisson of attraction between the two, although Virginia is wary; not only is he quite a bit older than she is (she’s twenty-one, he’s mid-thirties) and almost too good to be true, but her complicated relationship with her stern, reclusive father means she has little experience with men and is uncomfortable around them. Yet by the end of this brief time spent together, Virginia is desperately smitten and so, it seems, is Simon, and he tells her he’s going to write to her. Virginia is on cloud nine – until one of the other girls in her unit tells her Simon is married, with a young son.

You can read the rest of this review at AudioGals.

In Celebration of June Is Audiobook Month

To mark June is Audiobook Month, I and my fellow AudioGals have been choosing some of our favourite audiobooks in our favourite genres, and this week it was my turn to choose my Top Five Historical Romance audios. Which wasn’t easy. Last week saw Kaetrin picking her Top Five Contemporary Romances, and the week before that, BJ chose her Top Five Urban Fantasy/Paranormal listens. There’s still time to enter the giveaway for earbuds and downloads – head over to AudioGals and scroll down to the bottom of this week’s post for details.

In the meantime… my Top Five.

I might as well say this right now. I am utterly HOPELESS at choosing favourites. The minute anyone says to me “what’s your favourite (something)?” my mind goes completely blank and I struggle to think of ANYthing, let alone the ones I’d rate above all others. Then after the initial panic has subsided, I can think of too many. But because, when it comes to audiobooks, I’m someone who always places the narrator ahead of the author in terms of importance when it comes to choosing the ones I want to listen to (sorry, authors!), choosing five audiobooks I think would be a good introduction to historical romance in audio for someone who wants to take the plunge but doesn’t know where to start didn’t prove too difficult. My choices are therefore selected by narrator first; and as such, feature my “Fab Four” – four narrators I would quite happily listen to if they were reading the phone book.

You can read the rest of my list at AudioGals.

A Splendid Defiance by Stella Riley (audiobook) – Narrated by Alex Wyndham

splendid-defiance-audio-cover-1-2

This title may be downloaded from Audible via Amazon.

For two years, England has been in the grip of Civil War. In Banbury, Oxfordshire, the Cavaliers hold the castle, the Roundheads want it back and the town is full of zealous Puritans. Consequently, the gulf between Captain Justin Ambrose and Abigail Radford, the sister of a fanatically religious shopkeeper, ought to be unbridgeable. The key to both the fate of the castle and that of Justin and Abigail lies in defiance…but will it be enough?

A Splendid Defiance is a dramatic and enchanting story of forbidden love, set against the turmoil and anguish of the first English Civil War.

Rating: Narration – A; Content – A

Anyone who – like me – appreciates Historical Romance that has a firm emphasis on the “Historical” will find a great many things to enjoy in this new audiobook version of Stella Riley’s A Splendid Defiance.  Set during the turbulent years of the English Civil War, the novel tells the true story of the small garrison of around three hundred and fifty men who held the strategically important Royalist stronghold of Banbury Castle in Oxfordshire in the face of overwhelming odds, and many of the characters who grace its pages are people who actually existed.

Skilfully interwoven with the story of the castle and its defenders is the glorious (but fictional) slow-burn romance between Justin Ambrose, a cynical, acerbic captain in the King’s army and Abigail Radford, whose brother, Jonas, is a leader of the local community and a die-hard Puritan.  The romance starts very slowly – so anyone who expects the first kiss between the hero and heroine to happen in chapter three is going to be disappointed – but builds steadily throughout and is all the more believable as a result.  Justin and Abigail begin the story as strangers and the author allows their relationship to develop in a manner that feels perfectly realistic, considering he’s a serving army officer with duties to perform and Abby lives a very restrictive life controlled by her harsh zealot of a brother.

You can read the rest of this review at AudioGals

The Salt Hendon Collection by Lucinda Brant (audiobook) – Narrated by Alex Wyndham

salt-hendon-collection-audio

This title may be purchased from Audible via Amazon.

This special boxed set edition is for all the fans who requested actor Alex Wyndham’s narration of two of Lucinda Brant’s best-loved books, Salt Bride and its sequel Salt Redux. Also included is a 20,000-word bonus novella, Salt Angel, featuring well-loved characters from the Salt books.

The Salt Hendon Collection is a great introduction to Lucinda Brant’s richly romantic 18th century world, and Alex Wyndham’s superlative voice talent.


Salt Bride When the Earl of Salt Hendon marries squire’s daughter Jane Despard, Society is aghast. But Jane and Salt share a secret past of heartache and mistrust. They are forced into a marriage neither wants; the Earl to honor a dying man’s wish; Jane to save her stepbrother from financial ruin. Beautiful inside and out, the patient and ever optimistic Jane believes love conquers all; the Earl will take some convincing. Enter Diana St. John, who has been living in a fool’s paradise believing she would be the next Countess of Salt Hendon. She will go to extreme lengths, even murder, to hold Salt’s attention. Can the newlyweds overcome past prejudices and sinister opposition to fall in love all over again?


Salt Redux Jane and Salt: Four years of Happily Ever After
Sir Antony Templestowe: Four years of Exile
Lady Caroline: Four years of Heartache
Diana St. John: Four years plotting Revenge
The time has come…

How does a brother cope with life knowing his sister is a murderess?
How can a nobleman have the life he has always wanted when a lurking evil consumes his thoughts and haunts his dreams?

What will it take for good to triumph over evil?

Rating: Narration – A+; Content – Salt Bride: B+ / Salt Redux: B

I first listened to Lucinda Brant’s Salt Bride and Salt Redux a few years back, when they were most ably narrated by Marian Hussey. This new edition of both books (plus the novella, Salt Angel, originally published in A Timeless Romance Anthology: Silver Bells Collection) includes the original version of Salt Bride, with the prologue reinstated (it was removed from subsequent editions of the book as it provoked some controversy) and the audios are narrated by the supremely talented Alex Wyndham, whose performances of Ms. Brant’s other novels have made quite the impression on fans of romance audiobooks.

A marriage made because of the conditions of a will and a deathbed promise is probably not the most auspicious beginning to a relationship. But those are the conditions under which Miss Jane Despard is forced to accept the hand of Magnus Sinclair, the Earl of Salt Hendon (known as Salt). In order for her beloved step-brother to receive the bulk of his inheritance, Jane must marry before a certain date, and in order to fulfil a promise made to a dying man, Salt is obliged to offer for the woman who heartlessly jilted him four years earlier. He and Jane met during her début season and fell deeply in love, eagerly anticipating their vows on the night he proposed to her. Salt was called away before they could make the engagement official but failed to return – even when Jane sent him a note telling him she was pregnant – and later broke their engagement by letter. So Jane is bewildered when, on the first occasion they have seen each other in four years, Salt seems to feel that he is the injured party and makes it clear in no uncertain terms that his offer is made only because he is honour bound to make it and that once they are married, he intends to send her to live in the country while he continues with his life in London. But Jane is no simpering miss and makes Salt aware that she is just as unhappy about the situation as he is.

As the couple settle into their married life and each realises that they never really fell out of love, there is sufficient mistrust and uncertainty between them for neither to want to make the first move and admit it.   Jane becomes more and more convinced that Salt never knew of her pregnancy – but doesn’t know why her letter never reached him, and is still confused as to why he ended their betrothal so abruptly.  And Salt comes to realise that Jane’s life during their separation was not at all what he had supposed, and that his assumptions about her have been based on falsehoods.

The arranged marriage is a favourite trope of mine, and this one is bound up in all sorts of deliberately engineered misunderstandings and behind-the-scenes machinations by the villain of the piece, Lady Diana St. John, Salt’s cousin and the widow of his best friend.  She is obsessed by Salt to the point of insanity – but knowing that he will never marry her, she nonetheless aims to keep him for herself by acting as his hostess and remaining constantly at his side through the glittering political career for which she believes he is destined.

Diana is a well-realised character, even though she’s dangerously close to being over-the-top. She’s so devious and clever that there are times it seems as though she might actually get away with her nefarious schemes; and the depths to which she will go in order to obtain what she wants are truly horrifying when they are finally revealed.

One word of warning – Salt Bride opens with the rather traumatic scene of a young woman (Jane) in the midst of a deliberately induced miscarriage, which, while not graphic, may nonetheless prove upsetting.  This prologue was removed from the second edition of the book (and the Marian Hussey version of the audio) – and the information is drip-fed through the rest of the story (the miscarriage scene is still present in a slightly different form).  Personally, I prefer that version of the story, but the placement of that scene makes no difference to the way the story plays out.


Salt Redux picks up the story of the Salt Hendons some four years after the ending of Salt Bride.  Salt, Jane and their young family are happily living in the country away from the goldfish bowl of London, but decide that it is time for them to return and for Salt to resume his political career.  We learn that in the intervening years,  Sir Anthony Templestowe, Salt’s closest friend and relative (and a prominent secondary character in the previous book) was sent to St. Petersburg on a diplomatic posting following a public melt-down and descent into alcoholism; Salt’s sister, Caroline – with whom Anthony has been in love for years – married another man, and the evil Diana was exiled to a remote corner of Wales where she lives on one of Salt’s estates, surrounded by servants who are actually her jailers.

But four years in isolation has not quashed Diana’s ambitions one jot, and her obsession with Salt and hatred for Jane are stronger than ever.  After lots of careful planning and waiting, she poisons her guard, makes her escape and heads straight for London where she begins to re-insert herself into a society that was never made aware of the extent of her misdeeds, believing instead that she had gone abroad in the wake of her heartbreak over Salt’s marriage.  This decision, made in order to spare the families the massive scandal that would have ensued on revelation of the truth, naturally comes back to bite everyone in the backside, as it enables Diana to hide in plain sight and to begin her campaign to insert herself back into Salt’s life.

News of her escape brings a much healthier, dried-out Anthony back to London where he is shocked and annoyed to find Diana in residence at his town house.  Knowing that her presence is almost certain to mean danger for the Salt Hendons, Anthony decides the best policy is to play along with his sister in order to discover her intentions and then make sure they are thwarted.  Running parallel with the continuation of this storyline is that of Anthony’s romance with Caroline, who is now a widow.  There is a little hiccup along the way, with Caroline believing herself unworthy of so good a man, but fortunately, this isn’t dragged out and Caroline very sensibly determines to make a clean breast of it to the man she loves before accepting his proposal.  Their romance is fairly low key, however, as the driving force of the novel is the Diana plotline, which contains some truly nail-biting moments. With that said, however, there are times in the first part of the book when the imparting of information is deliberately delayed; and while I normally enjoy Ms. Brant’s detailed descriptions of the clothes, food, locations and customs of the period, I can’t deny that they sometimes hinder the progression of the plot.  But that isn’t always the case, and her descriptions of the customs of the Russian court are vivid and interesting.  She also handles the key moment of Anthony’s confession to Caroline very well indeed.


The set is finished off by the novella Salt Angel, which sees Kitty Aldershot, a secondary character from Salt Redux, get her happy ending with Jane’s brother, Tom, with a little help along the way from a delightfully charming, elderly Russian prince.


Given the highly accomplished performances Alex Wyndham has already delivered in a number of Ms. Brandt’s other books, it’s no wonder that she took the rather unusual step of having him re-record these stories.  His delivery and pacing are spot on, and he continues to display exceptional vocal acting skills when it comes to bringing out the emotional nuances behind the author’s words.  His character differentiation is absolutely superb; I didn’t count the number of characters who appear in both Salt Bride and Salt Redux, but the cast is quite large and every single member, regardless of gender, age or station, is easily distinguishable from the others.  His female voices are among the best I’ve ever heard from any male narrator, so the high-born ladies – Jane, Diana and Caroline – all sound as ladies of quality should. It’s easy to tell them apart, however, and Diana’s sneering hauteur is perfectly judged.  The two heroes – Salt and Anthony – are flawlessly portrayed.  Salt’s deep, resonant tones expertly conjure up the portrait of a man of power and influence who exudes confidence and latent sensuality, while Anthony’s velvety baritone works wonderfully to convey the character’s deep sense of honour and compassion.  Anyone who has listened to Mr. Wyndham before will know that he is an outstanding narrator, and anyone who hasn’t – well, you’re missing out and really should give him a try.

Coming in at just under twenty-four hours, listening to the set all in one go is a big commitment, but it’s obviously possible to divide it up into its constituent parts and tackle one story at a time. Salt Bride is probably the stronger of the two books, and while Salt Redux could just about be listened to on its own, I wouldn’t advise it, as so many of the characters and plotlines are introduced in the first book, and this is very much a continuation of that story.

But with Alex Wyndham at the helm, listening for long stretches is no hardship!


Breakdown of Grade:  Narration: A+  Content:  Salt Bride: B+/Salt Redux: B

Running Time: 23 hours and 50 minutes

Note:  The Salt Hendon Collection, narrated by Alex Wyndham is available ONLY as a boxed set of the two novels and the novella.  Salt Bride and Salt Redux continue to be available individually, narrated by Marian Hussey.

The Player (Rockliffe #3) by Stella Riley (audiobook) – Narrated by Alex Wyndham

The Player audio

This title is available to purchase from Audible via Amazon.

Tragedy drove him into unwilling exile. Death demands his reluctant return. In the decade between, he has answered to many names and amassed a variety of secrets. Now the actor known to Paris as L’Inconnu must resume his real identity and become Francis Adrian Sinclair Devereux, Earl of Sarre…a man he no longer knows how to be and whose name, thanks to the malice of a friend turned enemy, remains tarnished by an old scandal. Revenge, so long avoided, slithers temptingly from the shadows.

Granddaughter of a wealthy wool-merchant, Caroline Maitland is not finding her society debut either easy of enjoyable…but, to Marcus Sheringham, she is the perfect solution to his crushing mountain of debt. Knowing she will be married for her money, Caroline never believed she would find love; but neither did she bargain for a certain charming French highwayman…and a surprising turn of events. The stage is set, the cast assembled, and the Duke of Rockliffe waits for the curtain to rise. In the wings, Lord Sarre prepares to make his entrance. He doesn’t expect to be greeted with applause.

Rating: Narration – A+; Content – A-

Keen-eared listeners may have already worked out the identity of the hero of this, the third book in Stella Riley’s series of Georgian romances. In The Mésalliance, the Duke of Rockliffe mentioned seeing an actor at the Comedie Française in Paris who bore a striking resemblance to one Francis Adrian Sinclair Devereux, Earl of Sarre, who was the subject of a terrible scandal some ten years earlier.

That scandal concerned the death of his fiancée, who fell to her death from a rooftop and whom Adrian was subsequently accused of murdering. A day or two short of his twenty-second birthday and their wedding, distraught at the death of the girl he loved to distraction, Adrian protests his innocence, but all his autocratic father cares about is that there is no way of proving it and he immediately hurries Adrian out of the country to try to mitigate the scandal.

You can read the rest of this review at AudioGals.

add-to-goodreads-button

The Mésalliance (Rockliffe #2) by Stella Riley (audiobook) – narrated by Alex Wyndham

The Mésalliance audio

This title is available to download from Audible via Amazon.

The Duke of Rockliffe is 36 years old, head of his house, and responsible for his young sister, Nell. He is, therefore, under some pressure to choose a suitable bride. Whilst accompanying Nell to what he speedily comes to regard as the house-party from hell, he meets Adeline Kendrick – acid-tongued, no more than passably good-looking yet somehow alluring. Worse still, her relatives are quite deplorable – from a spoiled, ill-natured cousin to a sadistic, manipulative uncle. As a prospective bride, therefore, Adeline is out of the question. Until, that is, a bizarre turn of events cause the Duke to throw caution to the wind and make what his world will call a mésalliance.

Rating: Narration – A+; Content – A-

Originally published in 1990, The Mésalliance is the second book in Stella Riley’s series of Georgian romances, which began with The Parfit Knight and continues with The Player . Substantially revised since first publication, the book is a superb compromised-into-marriage story which sees the suave, sophisticated and unflappable Duke of Rockliffe meeting his match and getting his happy ending; although not without a journey through the emotional mangle – for both himself AND the listener – along the way.

As listeners of The Parfit Knight will already know, Rockliffe is the epitome of gentlemanly elegance, good breeding and excellent manners. He is also fiercely intelligent, loyal to his friends, thoroughly honourable and seemingly omniscient, somehow knowing everything worth knowing about everything and everyone. In the hands of a lesser author, such a paragon could have been priggish or irritating, but Rock isn’t either of those things. Beneath the carefully cultivated and highly polished exterior is a man of character, a man who would do anything for those he cares about and a man of rare insight and depth of feeling. And I defy anyone not to have fallen in love with him by the end of the book!

The story starts simply. Rockliffe is handsome, wealthy, and, at thirty-six years old, fully sensible of the fact that it’s time he did his duty and found himself a wife. Unfortunately for him, the one woman he has so far met who doesn’t bore him silly was already in love with his best friend by the time he met her, so seeking a suitable duchess from the remaining crop of debutantes and society ladies isn’t a particularly appealing prospect. Rock also has a younger sister who is in need of a steadying, female hand, a factor which is as important as Rock’s decision to marry as his eventual need for an heir.

Committed to attend a two-week house-party at the home of the Franklin family, Rock is resigned to a fortnight of doing the pretty among the simpering misses, and is surprised to see a familiar face among the guests. Adeline Kendrick is the Franklins’ niece, and it is soon clear to Rockliffe that while she is family, she is treated little better than a servant by them, especially by her lovely, but utterly spoiled and selfish cousin, Diana.

Although not a beauty, there is something in Adeline’s quiet strength and defiantly waspish tongue that intrigues Rockliffe and draws him to her. He is astonished to discover how much he wants her, but being a man of honour, knows there is nothing to done about it. Fate has other ideas however, because when Adeline discovers that Diana has hatched a scheme to entrap him, thwarting it places the two of them in a compromising position instead and there is nothing for it but for Rockliffe to offer marriage to Adeline – which he does with a lack of dismay about the situation that surprises him.

Things move quickly after that, but Adeline, taught by life to be cautious, isn’t willing to risk revealing the true nature of her feelings to Rockliffe and asks him for time to accustom herself to marriage before they consummate their union. Being the gentleman he is, her new husband agrees – not without difficulty – and decides to give Adeline the courtship their hasty marriage denied her. Unfortunately, however, it’s not long before Adeline’s slime-ball of an uncle, Richard Horton, insinuates himself into her life by telling her something unpleasant about her past and threatening to reveal it to Rockliffe if she doesn’t pay him to keep quiet.

From here on in, the tension in the story really ratchets up. Adeline, knowing how much Rock has done for her in marrying her can’t face the prospect of being responsible for tarnishing his good name and reputation, and the tissue of lies and misunderstandings between them spiral out of control until they eventually reach a point where it seems almost impossible that they will ever be able to work things out.

I have to say that I am not overly fond of the Big Misunderstanding in romances, but I’ve been a fan of Stella Riley’s for almost thirty years, and I knew that if anyone could pull it off she could. And she does. While it’s certainly frustrating that Rock and Adeline don’t – or can’t – talk to each other about their problems, Adeline’s reasons for not wanting to do so are perfectly understandable, as is Rockliffe’s withdrawal when he believes her to be uninterested in him; and the all the roiling emotions concealed beneath the surface are skilfully realised. It’s wonderfully angsty and beautifully written, and the characterisation of Rock is superb. In the latter part of the story especially, the author brilliantly conveys the sense of a man on a tight rein and close to coming completely undone. Adeline is perhaps a little harder to like because of what she puts Rock through, but she’s nonetheless the sort of heroine one can root for; strong and determined, she has had to grow a thick skin and learn to look after herself given the treatment she received at the hands of her uncaring relatives.

Without wishing to take anything away from the author, who has written a tremendous story, the narration by the supremely talented Alex Wyndham takes The Mésalliance to a whole new level of excellence. He has a real affinity for and understanding of the material, and his ability to get under the skin and into the heads of the characters is exceptional. His interpretation of Rockcliffe is simply stunning, so much so that the word “performance” seems an inadequate description for what I was listening to. He captures the essence of the character absolutely, adopting a soft, always precise manner that leaves the listener in no doubt as to Rock’s incredible self-possession while also hinting at a deeply buried vulnerability. I can imagine that portraying a character who prides himself on maintaining his sang-froid at all times, and then having him gradually abandon that control while at the same time keeping him completely in character must have presented a challenge – but if that was the case, one would never know it, because Mr Wyndham ‘s performance in those parts of the story is sublime.

Another thing that impressed me hugely is the way he handles the large supporting cast with such aplomb. Every single one of the numerous secondary characters is voiced distinctly so that, even in the case of those who don’t appear very often, they are immediately recognisable and there is no question of confusing them with anyone else. And those who do appear regularly, such as Amberley, Jack Ingram and Harry Caversham are easy to distinguish from one another and everyone else, while Richard Horton’s pinched, nasal drawl is the perfect match for the malevolence of his character.

I can’t do anything other than recommend the audiobook of The Mésalliance most strongly to fans of the genre and romance audiobooks in general. Ms Riley writes with intelligence and charm, and has the knack of creating the most delicious heroes and cracking sexual tension between her protagonists. If you’ve listened to Alex Wyndham before, then you’re not going to need much convincing to listen to him again. His performance here is possibly his best yet, and even though I can’t imagine how he could possibly improve on it, I have no doubt he will prove me wrong when The Player is released in a few weeks’ time.

add-to-goodreads-button